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BOOKS: on Cooking, Ecology, Herbalism, Farming & Foraging

We’re often asked to suggest our favorite cookbooks. To not overwhelm you we’ve gathered a select edit and included some of our most beloved references on foraging, herbalism, farming and ecology as well. If you have additions we should consider, please add them in comments. In alphabetical order: Cooking: A Platter of Figs and Other Recipes, David Tanis At Home in The Whole Food Kitchen, Amy Chaplin Change of Appetite, Diana Henry Cooking For Artist, Mina Stone Every Grain of Rice, Fuschia Dunlop Everything I Want to Eat, Jessica Koslow High Vibrational Beauty, Kerrilynn Pamer and Cindy Diprima Morisse  Hot, Sour, Salty, Sweet, Jeffrey Alford and Naomi Duguid Japanese Farm Food, Nancy Singleton Hachisu My New Roots, Sarah Britton Nopalito, Gonzalo Guzmán...

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ROSE GERANIUM

The skin is a semi permeable membrane and what we put on it has the ability to not only penetrate the skin but also to enter the blood stream. At LINNÉ we see that as an opportunity, not a threat, and use ingredients that are as kind to our internal organs as they are to our skin.  One such ingredient is Pelargonium graveolens essential oil. Within our formulations we use a varietal known as , or “rose geranium”. As the name indicates it has a beautiful rose like smell, and thus has had great importance in the perfume industry where both flowers and leaves are distilled for its scent. Beyond pleasing aromatics, this varietal further provides a host of medicinal attributes....

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OLIVE LEAF

We incorporate organic olea europaea (OLIVE) leaf into PURIFY and REFRESH so to enjoy its myriad benefits. Olive leaf is known to provide excellent anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial activity. Olive leaf may help to reduce swelling, redness, and psoriasis, and can work to prevent against sun damage and dehydration. Olive leaf, owing to its content of secoiridoid oleuropein, is known to rapidly accelerate wound healing and research has demonstrated olive leaf’s potential to even protect against skin cancer.Beyond topical applications, long-term use of olive leaf as a preventive agent has shown to benefit people who are particularly susceptible to colds, viruses, and stress. Other benefits include normalisation of heart beat irregularities,diminished cravings, and reduced pain from hemorrhoids, toothaches, and chronically achy...

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CLAY

Let’s hear it for clay! It has a myriad of uses within the context of health and is the material that allowed for humanity’s oldest handicraft: pottery. The earliest recorded evidence of clay usage dates back to the Late Palaeolithic period in central and western Europe, where fired and unfired clay figurines were created as a form of artistic expression. I made my first pinch pot almost 30 years ago and my first clay mask 23 years ago, so clay and I have history too :) There are many different types of facial clays and they are usually identified by their color, from green, to yellow, to red and black. The different colors indicate the presence of other potentially nutritive elements,...

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PHYTOREMEDIATION

Phytoremediation is a low cost, solar-energy driven technique that uses plants to cleanup contaminated environments. The presence of plants can help control and contain pollutants by preventing wind, rain, and groundwater flow from carrying contaminants deeper underground and to surrounding areas. Trees act like a pump, drawing groundwater up through their roots to keep it immobilized.Beyond trees there are many types of plants that can help protect the spread of noxious metals, pesticides, explosives and oil. Some of the best are willow and poplar trees, hemp, sunflower, ‘Indian’ grass and mustard.There are also a range of plant behaviors that do more than just hault the spread of undesired substances. Plants can metabolize contaminants (phytodegredation); produce biochemicals that can sequester nearby...

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